Date: Thursday, September 22, 2011
Source: http://www.dontwakemeup.com/illustration
Critique: The piece, Warpaint, by illustrator Kelly Dyson, first catches the eye by the use of colour. The combination of blue and orange make a very bright composition. The figures in blue are contrasted against the orange background, and come into the viewer’s focus. The eye will naturally go back and forth between the four figures, starting from the leftmost figure. The left figure is where the eye will start because she possesses more orange than the other figures— her hair is mostly orange, highlighted by blue, giving it more contrast and making it less flat than the other figures’ all blue hair, and her clothing is also orange. From there, the viewer will start taking in the other figures, going right. Each figure is predominately blue, and so the viewer’s eye will be drawn to the orange ‘warpaint’ on each of their faces. The viewer will then circle back to the first figure again. The typeface used in the word ‘WARPAINT’ helps compliment the word itself as well. The letters seem to be dripping, such as if they were painted on hastily. The word is also in white, so it does not detract from the image of the women. The bar of information at the bottom of the composition is placed and coloured effectively— the colours stray from the main colour palate used, so they bring attention to the information, but it does not compare to the contrast between the orange and blue, so it does not distract from the main image. The difference between the heights and pattern of paint on each figure helps add a dynamic feel to the composition, and keeps it from being static. Overall, it is a very captivating poster illustration that will keep the attention of it’s viewers and inform them of the event it is advertising.

Date: Thursday, September 22, 2011

Source: http://www.dontwakemeup.com/illustration

Critique: The piece, Warpaint, by illustrator Kelly Dyson, first catches the eye by the use of colour. The combination of blue and orange make a very bright composition. The figures in blue are contrasted against the orange background, and come into the viewer’s focus. The eye will naturally go back and forth between the four figures, starting from the leftmost figure. The left figure is where the eye will start because she possesses more orange than the other figures— her hair is mostly orange, highlighted by blue, giving it more contrast and making it less flat than the other figures’ all blue hair, and her clothing is also orange. From there, the viewer will start taking in the other figures, going right. Each figure is predominately blue, and so the viewer’s eye will be drawn to the orange ‘warpaint’ on each of their faces. The viewer will then circle back to the first figure again. The typeface used in the word ‘WARPAINT’ helps compliment the word itself as well. The letters seem to be dripping, such as if they were painted on hastily. The word is also in white, so it does not detract from the image of the women. The bar of information at the bottom of the composition is placed and coloured effectively— the colours stray from the main colour palate used, so they bring attention to the information, but it does not compare to the contrast between the orange and blue, so it does not distract from the main image. The difference between the heights and pattern of paint on each figure helps add a dynamic feel to the composition, and keeps it from being static. Overall, it is a very captivating poster illustration that will keep the attention of it’s viewers and inform them of the event it is advertising.